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Shelf Life improvement for Fruits and Vegetables with Suitable Packaging Technologies: High-Pressure Processing

Shelf Life improvement for Fruits and Vegetables with Suitable Packaging Technologies: High-Pressure Processing

The food market must mainly meet four major challenges today:

1. Reduction of food waste

2. Increasing food safety and consumer protection

3. More careful handling of resources

4. Development and use of need-oriented solutions that take current and future trends into account.

Improvement of Shelf Life of Fruit and Vegetables with Suitable Packaging Technologies

Improvement of Shelf Life of Fruit and Vegetables with Suitable Packaging Technologies

Food manufacturers and producers, the industry, packagers, exporters, importers, and the trade are called on to use available, optimum packaging technologies, packaging machines and packaging materials to extend the shelf life and to improve the quality of sensitive, easily perishable products. As a result, they can contribute to improved food safety, maximum consumer protection and the avoidance of food waste.

High pressure homogenization for production of low fat emulsions

Homogenization is a mechanical process for reducing the relative heterogeneity of a system and for producing a homogeneous size distribution of particles suspended in a liquid. A high-pressure homogenization (HPH), also known as dynamic or ultra-high pressure homogenization (UHPH), is a relatively new technology recently introduced through the development of a new generation of homogenizers. This new generation is capable of attaining pressures 10 – 15 times higher than traditional homogenizers, opening a wide range of new possibilities in food processing and biotechnology.

Cultures in salami and  raw cured muscles applications

Cultures in salami and raw cured muscles applications

Sauerkraut, cheese and sausages are examples of food products obtained by one of the oldest processes still in use: fermentation. Already known more than 10 000 years ago for the storage and the transport of food products, the principle of fermentation was however understood much later by Pasteur, in 1857. Described as “the life without air”, fermentation consists in low-energy biochemical reactions occurring in the food matrix (Ockerman H.W. & Basu L., 2014). Natural, this phenomenon is due to the growth of live bacteria present in the raw materials and in the environment of the factory.

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Guido Oppenhäuser • Tel.: +49 (0) 69/24 788-213 G.Oppenhaeuser(at)DLG.org